Episode 32: Julie Dixon on The Entrepreneurial Family

home Sep 07, 2021
Julie Dixon on The Entrepreneurial Family

Julie Dixon is a wife and mom who nurtures space for her family to live out their priorities in an entrepreneurial way. Listen as she shares the foundational things she makes sure are in place as she holds space for her families creativity.

Connect with Julie.. on IG

Find out more about or join Ryland membership site Bible Builds or her husband Brian's marketing membership site Business Builder Academy

 Julies's favorite gadget is her uncrustable maker! 

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This is a transcript of the This Mom Knows Podcast - Episode - 32

Jennifer Uren
Julie Dixon, is wife to Brian and mom to three talented kids. She's also a champion of women trying to build an influential home with a strong foundation on biblical truth. As a former classroom teacher, married to an educator turned entrepreneur, teaching and training are at the core of everything that they do. She is Margin Maker and Chief Encouragement Officer for her family, which are titles that I think every mom should embrace. So welcome, Julie.

Julie Dixon
Thank you. Thank you for having me, Jennifer.

Jennifer Uren
Oh, I'm so excited. So why don't you tell us a little bit more than what that bio shared? Like maybe where you grew up, how you met Brian, some things like that?

Julie Dixon
Sure, absolutely. So my parents were missionaries in Italy. And I'm the youngest of four children. So I lived my first four years in Italy, and then moved to Pennsylvania, and lived in the Hershey, Pennsylvania area, then outside of Philadelphia, Bucks County. And then my last three years of high school, were in West Chicago, Illinois. So I've kind of bounced around a lot, which made me very aware of feeling included and wanting to be invited and wanting to invite other people in, who might not feel included. And so that's kind of marked my whole life. I met Brian in college. So I was a junior in college, and he transferred in my junior year as a graduate student in education. And we shared a math for teachers class, and we had to pick partners. So I was sitting in front of him, he tapped me on the shoulder for a partner activity. And I turned around and he asked me to be his partner. So we got to know each other real fast from math class. And that's how we met.

Jennifer Uren
Oh, and you had no idea what a loaded question that really was.

Julie Dixon
Exactly!

Jennifer Uren
That's great. So did you learn Italian?

Julie Dixon
Only I was four when we left. So I learned all the commands that you would tell a child up to four, like, come here, drop that, stop that. All of that, but my siblings and my parents speak fluent Italian.

Jennifer Uren
Okay. Well, that's cool. Oh, well, that's fun. I'm in the Chicago area. So you were close to me when you were in West Chicago.

Julie Dixon
Yeah.

Jennifer Uren
But you mean true West Chicago, not the western part of the city. Right?

Julie Dixon
Correct. Yes, right outside of Wheaton.

Jennifer Uren
Okay. Well, let's talk a little bit more today about entrepreneurship in the home because you're in a really unique family. And we'll get to that a little bit with your kids. But right now, let's talk about kind of how you're not a mompreneur in the traditional sense. But you're married to a serial entrepreneur, and you have kids who are getting into the action, and you're heavily involved in all those things. But it wasn't always that way. When you were first married, I believe you and Brian both had regular jobs. So what was it that began to shift away from a job to creating and building these businesses and trying new things?

Julie Dixon
Yes, so I was a classroom teacher for eight and a half years, I taught third and fifth grade. Absolutely loved it. And Brian, he also taught in the classroom and then went into administration, higher education. But before I met Brian, he had been in a band when he lived in Canada, he had created a solo album. And we realized that he was in marketing and sales at that point. He was on the phones pre internet, calling to book gigs to sell the music. And so he had that in him before I even met him. I am much more of a like, safe, predictable, systematic person. So I didn't think that way. But when we lived in San Diego, where we were teachers and doing our graduate work, the cost of living was so high, we did have to come up with some like side gigs, to pay for our education. And so I tutored, I taught summer camps. Brian sold books on Amazon while we were teaching and doing graduate work, and he would listen to all these like productivity gurus. He was getting into podcasts, he listened to Jim Rohn and Tony Robbins and Zig Ziglar. And then he learned about Dan Miller and learned so much through these virtual mentors on business. We actually, Brian and I, we created a DVD for parents to help them with Internet safety, educating them on it and giving them equip equipping them really, to help keep their kids safe online. So that took us to churches where we would speak and encourage families and sell these DVDs. I hope you don't look, go find it because it's so ancient now.

Jennifer Uren
Everyone has to start somewhere, right?

Julie Dixon
Everyone starts somewhere. And so a Brian kind of dragged me into this world because that's not my natural comfort zone. I like I was fine being in the classroom and just continuing that way. But as he was listening to all these different mentors, I was kind of getting, like being audited, I was auditing their their things, too, and I was learning to think a little bit differently. Well, I got pregnant with our first and we Brian was given a job opportunity to start a school in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. And the cost of living was less, and we decided, let's go there. It was a great opportunity for him. And I always knew when our kids were little, I wanted to stay home with them. So this allowed me to do that. And in the process of him starting the school, it was a charter school, he realized how much marketing goes into that type of job. You he had to convince parents to send their kids to a school that never existed before, with a very interesting model as a project based model that was not being done in that area. And so he learned to do Facebook ads and had parent events and on and on and on. And realize there weren't a lot of resources for school leaders like himself to recruit and bring kids to the school. And so he actually wrote a book on it as well to help other people. But all of this was going on and he really realized he had a real knack with sales and marketing. So he continued to go to these different conferences, to learn about it while he was also a school leader. And there was a point in our life where my mom started to deal with some really severe health issues. And so we started thinking, how can we get to be near my family who was in South Carolina at the time, and we were in Louisiana. Okay, so that began that journey of how can we pivot so we can be closer to family, and that's what led to jumping into entrepreneurship.

Jennifer Uren
Okay, so really, it sounds like it was you all decided we want to stop trading our time for money, and we want to start controlling our time while still making money.

Julie Dixon
Correct.

Jennifer Uren
Okay, so you're pregnant at this point? I'm assuming maybe before the move the baby had been born. And so did you just jump in with both feet and say, Okay, I'm in and I'm not going to work, and you've got to it's make it or break it?

Julie Dixon
Well, so when we had our first he was getting two paychecks a month, you know, everything was covered. So it was very, a real easy transition in terms of security for me. We, we reduced our cost of living, we lived in a real small place in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, and it was great, like we just had a fine life. And when we pivoted though, to entrepreneurship, we then had two kids, four and a one year old. And two years after that, a third one came along. So we were in the season of really like hands on parenting, physically, mentally demanding. And I, I needed to have some buffer some margin. So we had three months savings. And he had two contracts when we moved to North Carolina. So I thought okay, that's good. Well, Jennifer, it doesn't stay that way!

Jennifer Uren
No!

Julie Dixon
That money goes fast. So the contracts ended. And as much as we wanted to trade time, you know, not trade time for money, right? But trade ideas for money. He was on the hustle bus like he was trading time for money constantly trying to figure out what his next gig would be who would pay him next and he wasn't really that clear on his audience at that point or his message or his product. So it I would have the conversation with him like we have three months like runway here. Like if we don't make X amount or we don't get to this point. Yes, we need to go back to the J-O-B. We need to find a job. We kept it kept being in three months, three months. And God would always fill in that gap, we somehow we would make it work, we would reduce our our living expenses again. And it wasn't until he started to get residual income from membership sites that we could kind of relax and breathe and get a little bit more creative and a bit a bit more clear on what he was doing in his business. So that took about five years.

Jennifer Uren
Okay. Okay. And that was three months, I was gonna ask you about that, too. That's feels short, to me, that doesn't feel like a lot of buffer. I think some people would say, you know, I need a year's worth of buffer or something.

Julie Dixon
Smarter people! yes!

Jennifer Uren
Well, you learned a little bit of that risk taking maybe through auditing his, his books with him.

Julie Dixon
I did, and but here's the thing I knew. And, you know, not everyone's the same in terms of their, their marriage or their family. But I knew he was created for entrepreneurship. I knew he had it in him. He worked hard. He was an ideas guy who loved helping people. And often after he left a conversation with someone, they would just say, oh, I've never thought about doing it that way. Or you gave me so much clarity. But we didn't exactly know how to package it. And we knew his natural gifts, and we knew his credentials, you know, his resume. So it was like, how do you figure out it just took us a while to figure it out?

Jennifer Uren
Yes. But he kept going. And I know from watching other people, he couldn't have without you backing him and being supportive and encouraging of it. Because that I think that's what stops so many people is home. And you know, "responsibility". But it's, it's, it's more than that it's a bigger conversation. When you have a nine to five job, though, there is some semblance of separation of work and home. But when you're an entrepreneur, and I know Brian can be this way, it can be really hard to turn that off. So what do you do? I think this is where your role as Chief Margin Maker comes in. What What do you do? What have you done to make sure that this new venture didn't become what life rotated around, but you kept your values of, you know, family and faith first?

Julie Dixon
That's a great question. I don't really know of any entrepreneurs that fully turn it off, I think of it more like a dial, you turn the volume down, and you turn the volume up on a dial in another area of your life. So for us, we had to be really clear and intentional about office hours. For us, it ended up being pretty traditional, just because his clients work on that same timeframe from a nine to five. Now, we did try to do like a hard stop at five and do family time from five to eight. And then if he wanted to jump back into doing some work, he would do it. So we just had to come up with some parameters for that. But our greatest challenge, Jennifer was actually that he was working from home, I was home with the children. And we had accessibility, you know, to each other all day long. And that sounds great in theory, but we had to get really clear about honoring each other's time and giving each other kind of a heads up. If we wanted to talk about money, or calendar or travel, we learned to say, hey, I'd love to talk to you about this. Do you have five minutes now? Or can we schedule that in like 10 minutes or tomorrow? So we just had to learn how to communicate about, you know, honoring and protecting each other's time. And I would say that's important to the spouse, because even though they're not maybe getting paid for their work, they've got things that they're doing or planning in their day. So Brian, learned to respect that, you know, I might have been in the middle of correcting one of our kids when he comes down with this exciting news.

Jennifer Uren
Yeah.

Julie Dixon
And I'm not trying to be rude, but I just said, Hey, I'd love to hear that and be kind to him, you know, but let me finish this with this child and then I'm all yours.

Jennifer Uren
Yes, yeah. And I get that and I think a lot of people get that differently because of COVID and everyone shifting to home.

Julie Dixon
Exactly.

Jennifer Uren
And seeing that. You know, the It's great for a week vacation when you're all together. But not everyone is wired for working together, but separate, you know, and doing that. So that's, that's really good that you guys recognized that early. Do keep like a running list of "things I need to tell Brian, when I see him next", you know, so you can,

Julie Dixon
yes, sometimes, yes. And, you know, the second thing that was really a great challenge was our different ways of communicating. We really struggled early in our marriage on not the ability to communicate, we're both teachers, we're both good with words, and we know how to send a clear message, it was that we were not understanding each other's style. And when we were in those early years of entrepreneurship, you know, we're struggling, we're isolated. Brian didn't have a community, he didn't have a coach at that time. So he's telling me all his ideas, all his fears, all his wins. And we got to a point where we realized he needed somebody else that was like minded as an entrepreneur, to run these thoughts through, and also a coach to help him filter out some of these ideas. And so not to take, you know, the, the, the responsibility off of me to be a kind listener. But we realized, number one, my natural response, Jennifer to a lot of his ideas is no, or I'll tell you 10 reasons why that's the worst idea I've ever heard. You know, so you can hear my tone right? Now, you wouldn't want to tell me your ideas. Like, I, I'm just so negative. And he realized, or I, both of us realize he sometimes just needed to share an idea for the fun mental exercise of a vision casting and what could be. And my natural response is, how do we practically apply this right now?

Jennifer Uren
Yes.

Julie Dixon
So what resources would we need? How will this impact my schedule, the family dynamic? So for example, he at one point, wanted to livestream our family, like a YouTube channel, okay, with a six, three, and a newborn newborn? And so my response, you know, was? "No, that's so dumb, you know, and these are the reasons why" and so over the years, we've learned, actually, that's probably not the kindest way, but we need to understand how each other hears something. And our number one goal is connection before trying to prove who's right and who's wrong.

Jennifer Uren
Yeah.

Julie Dixon
So that has helped over the years. And then in terms of like, margin today, we share everything on a Google Calendar. And I try to kind of take a bird's eye view of the month. And I know this sounds a little funny, but I kind of try to like feel it out. Kind of, oh, look at all the things that kids are doing after school. Brian's got a trip here. When are we going to be having dinners together? When are we going to have a day that there's just nothing and we create what our priorities are just like your listeners, you know, if family dinners are a priority, be intentional about that. Or if date nights are a priority, or just me time where I can go away and so Brian knows he's on the clock with the kids. Just we have to be intentional about what fills us up. And then I make sure that the calendar reflects that. So that's, that's margin making. Brian is not good about margin. He looked he says, Go go go right. And

Jennifer Uren
All the time. Yep.

Julie Dixon
All the time. And that, in one sense, really does fill him up. But I can feel and see his energy draining before he does. So I really, I enjoy saying like, okay, after this trip, or after this webinar, or after this product launch, he needs to take half a day on Wednesday just to celebrate the win or read and think, and oftentimes it's in those downtimes where he gets his best ideas for the next thing.

Jennifer Uren
Yeah. So it sounds like you almost did two things through all of this and one was by having him talk to other people it didn't water down his ideas when he came to you, you know, this is something that I need to pay attention to because it's it's made it through all these, these filters and checkmarks. But the other is, is you took your superpower of saying no, and you put it in where it really became a protection and a guard Instead of a, you know, a restriction?

Julie Dixon
Yes, yes.

Jennifer Uren
That's excellent. That's great. So now you've kids in the equation. And so obviously, it's it's healthy for the family that you're serving in this role. But I know you encourage them to be entrepreneurial was that always sort of part of the plan, or did that as they grew, just sort of be something you you noticed and decided to integrate?

Julie Dixon
I think kids are so cool. You know, they come up with like, the best ideas from lemonade stands to bracelet, you know, making, they're just like creators at heart and nothing deters them. So our kids have constantly been coming up with creative ideas, and your kids probably do as well. And so as a parent, you just want to say, "Well, I want to nurture this, I don't want them to, to lose this idea that there they are a creator." And one of our philosophies at home is that we want to be creators, not just consumers, how can we add value to other people around us through our gifts, our natural abilities, our personality. And so our oldest, during COVID, he was in this little Lego group, it was a text thread, the moms had the text thread. And what the boys would do is, one boy would would announce like a challenge, a Lego challenge, and then all the other boys would build something. So for example, like a marble run out of Legos, so they would all make their version and then submit it to the text thread. And then they'd vote on each other's and whoever won got to be the one to pick the next category. And so they did this for a couple months, and they had fun and and then Brian said to Ryland, our oldest who was 10, at the time, "how could we maybe consider making this into a business, taking things that you are good at that you know, and that you love, and that could solve a problem for other people." And so they got brainstorming, and Ryland has great knowledge and love for the Bible, and for Legos. And so they came up with this idea that he would rewrite in his own 10 year old language, a Bible story, he would record it on a video and upload it into a on a website. And it would be a story that would encourage children to build recreate the story using Legos. Then the children would submit their builds, they vote on each other, and he'd give a gift card like an Amazon or Lego gift card every week to the winner. So Brian, knowing how to make membership sites, he actually had a team member build it. And Ryland started to learn he added some text to the website as well. And then Brian announced it on his different platforms. And at the height, height of memberships, Ryland had 28 kids involved. And so I don't even know if they I think it was like $15 a month, something like that. And so Ryland started seeing, oh, my goodness, this idea that I take one day a week to do, he would write it and record it in a span of two to four hours every Sunday. Okay. This is actually, you know, creating something profitable and making money from this. This is so amazing. So, yeah, so that, that was really neat for him to see that from idea to actual product. And then the kids being really excited about it, and especially the parents, the parents were raving about it.

Jennifer Uren
Yeah.

Julie Dixon
So this went on for eight weeks. And then a well known author, speaker reached out to Brian and said, "Hey, we don't know each other, but we have a lot of friends in common. I saw your son's idea through social media. And I actually had a similar idea, but I didn't want to step on your feet. Would you consider us buying it from you?" And so we said, "well, we'll have to talk to Ryland and see what he thinks." And so long story short, Ryland agreed. He became 20% owner of the business. And as it stands now, Ryland just flies out twice a year to LA with Brian. I mean, they have such a blast there,

Jennifer Uren
That's great

Julie Dixon
being, you know, together, and he records for about four hours a day on camera. He doesn't have to write anything. Jefferson Bethke, he, the now owner of Bible builds is the one that has created all the new curriculum and then it goes on telepromtp and Ryland just reads it. So that's where it's turned out to be. And Ryland sees a residual check every quarter from this business idea.

Jennifer Uren
That's great. And my son is a member of Bible Builds and loves it because he loves Lego. And I see how, you know, he's either going to build Star Wars, or he's building the Garden of Eden like, right, there's no, there's no in between, right. But I love how this has encouraged him to think of detail in his build that he wasn't thinking about before. So it's great. And I will put a link in the show notes to that because it is a great membership. And you know, I mean, Ryland has done at 10, 11 years old, what so many adults are still striving to do so I think that's phenomenal. Does he have any plans for anext thing? Or is he just enjoying being a kid now with money?

Yeah, So he, um, he's still thinking of the next idea. But right now, it's more of just how to be wise with the money he's receiving, and where to invest, where to save that type of thing. And, and here's the thing, I mean, we've all seen how we've had to pivot the whole society to a digital world during COVID. If businesses weren't already there, you know, they were forced to be. Education, conferences, our groceries, all of it is digital. And so as parents, we want to teach our kids to be wise in these different areas of life in, in, in money and time in resources. And so Brian being the futurist thinking ahead, I think one way that he wants our kids to be wise is to think how can they use their gifts and their skills in today's culture in today's world, given the resources and tools that we have, at our, you know, at our, you know, to use the way that we can? So since Brian has this knowledge with technology, he can naturally help the kids. But the kids, you know, they're gonna surpass us with digital stuff in by next year.

Yeah. And it's interesting that you all started with this parenting DVD on technology, because it is everywhere now. And I know even with my my middle daughter, if she sees me on my phone, I'm on screens, there's, but there's not this distinction naturally built in between creating and consuming. And you know, I may be listening to a book, I may be responding to an email. But it doesn't matter. I'm on my phone.

Julie Dixon
Right.

Jennifer Uren
And so how do you still take this idea that you all started with, with being wise with technology, but now in this world of it's everywhere, still put those boundaries in and teach them to use it and not be used by it?

Julie Dixon
It is, this is a great question. And we have just started talking, Brian and I just started talking about this. Because the the idea of putting Ryland on his own Instagram has come up with Bible Builds, because you know, kids want to see who Ryland Dixon is outside of Bible Builds.

Jennifer Uren
Yeah.

Julie Dixon
Um, I think that has to be a conversation, you know, in your home with the decision makers, but for me, like my natural response, again, is like No. You know, he's too young, I don't want to, to burden him with this. You know, I know that the it is a burden, like kids are getting 500 text messages from their friend, you know, between eight and 11 at night. I mean, it's just, it's too much. It's too much, in my opinion. So how can we be intentional, though, about maybe this moment for Ryland right now, for example, this little platform he has, how can we use this for good, and to set him up for success? So we've been talking about, like more broader and saying, like, okay, for college, for example, like you want to show on your resume, where you've been an activist or where you've been serving or your extracurricular things to show that you're a well rounded person. I think the future is platforms for a lot of children and your platform is an opportunity to show who you are. So who who do you want to be who who do you believe you're called to be? How do you want to contribute to to the world and to the community. Let's start reflecting that with your platform. So I think that's one way you can really use it for good, but be intentional about what what the purpose is, and, and how to be wise with your time and your resources. And, you know, that's ongoing. But

Jennifer Uren
yeah,

Julie Dixon
I don't know if that was a clear answer.

Jennifer Uren
No, but it's helpful because I think you alluded to this idea of, we want to be authentically who we are what we present. And not this made up fake false persona. And I think that's, that's a big catch. It was interesting the other day, my husband said, he is he has a master's in counseling psychology. And one of the things that we learned about is this age where kids think they have an audience, this invisible audience. But he said, interestingly enough, this is probably the first generation where that audience isn't invisible because of social media. And so it's changing how you parent because of who you are, and where people can see it. So it is an ongoing conversation. It's, it's a hard one, but I think that's a good key is that authentic engagement and not pretending to be something you're not? So we've talked a little bit about your role as Chief, you know, as Margin Maker and Chief Encouragement Officer. How, how do you enforce those limits, though, within this world of creativity?

Julie Dixon
Yeah, so yeah, that I think that comes back down to priorities. You know what? For me, it's time budgeting, really, you know? Man, I don't think I have, like, the right answer. But I just think it's, you know, for your family and your kids, what stage and season they're at what they need from you, where you and your husband are at, or your spouse, you know, what you're needing? And a lot of times ask myself, Is this enough? You know, am I doing, you know, is this five minute time on the floor playing Legos with our five year old? Is that enough, you know, um, because I, I don't think we have to spend, you know, hours with every single person, but you, you just have to know what isn't needed, kind of keep up a pulse, or you're reading the temperature of your family of your room. And for me, that means accessibility, I do, I do want to be available mentally for my family, because I think that you can be fully, physically there and completely absent in your mind. That has happen has happened to me many times, where Brian's saying words, and I'm just like, please stop talking, I need to finish my thought. Or our children are doing, you know, Mommy, and it goes on and on and on forever. And you're really wanting to give your attention. So there are I think there are some sort of like red flags that I use for when I know I'm too busy, or I don't have enough margin. And that's like, at five o'clock, if I don't know what for dinner, and there's no food in the house. I'm too busy.

Jennifer Uren
Yeah

Julie Dixon
That's usually the first thing. If I'm annoyed, that people want to share their heart with me that are in my home, I'm annoyed because I feel like I can't have enough space in my mind. I'm too busy, or I need, I need to go do something for myself to fill me up. So I can be available. So those are like, you know, little things that are my warning signs.

Jennifer Uren
So it sounds like when you know yourself and can can do what you need to do, then you can be the protector of the margin for everyone else and watch for their, their red flags. Like you mentioned earlier you do for Brian saying you're empty and you don't know it yet.

Julie Dixon
Yeah, so with Brian, you know, if he starts getting, I can tell when he's not fully, you know, in tune with the kids or with me. So, um, you know, I can see he's half listening, or he's on a screen and he's listening. You know, like, it's dinner time it for me, it's no screens, you know, you leave your phone, unless something's burning down in a business, you know, that he has to be on. But other than that, like, that's protected time. And for the kids, you know, if they're grumpy if they're on each other, if they're being disrespectful, you know, if it's once or twice, I'm like you're a kid, you know, that's normal. But if it's, if it's a pattern, then that tells me something else bigger is going on. And it's really hard not to take it personally, as a mom, I think. And so, I've learned that this is really not about me, and I need to check in with them. So that might mean a walk with one child. Or just "Hey, I'm going to go to the grocery store or Target." I want you to jump in the car and we just get that one on one time. Naturally with the rhythm of life.

Jennifer Uren
Yes. My my oldest, pretty much told me if I'm hard on you take it as a compliment, because it means I feel safe. It's like, good point!

Julie Dixon
Wow. Wise one!

Jennifer Uren
Yes. So what is the craziest idea that Brian has ever come up with?

Julie Dixon
Craziest? Oh, how much time do you have? Oh, Jennifer. Oh, well, something that we've done is we put a zip line in our basement. That's pretty crazy.

Jennifer Uren
That is kind of crazy.

Julie Dixon
Yeah. So it's fun. But, but crazy. It was either that or the woods. Um, and we figured we would use it more if it was in the basement.

Jennifer Uren
So that's great an excuse to invite people over.

Julie Dixon
That's Right. Sign an waiver before you come.

Jennifer Uren
That's right. Exactly. Yes, your homeowners insurance! Oh, well, this has been a great conversation. And as we wrap up, I do want to ask you a question I ask everybody. I am a gadget girl. I love tools and systems and anything that'll that'll help me save time. So what is your favorite time saving tool, system, or trick?

Julie Dixon
Okay, this is the thing that I have been loving recently is to freeze their sandwiches for lunch. I batch them ahead of time. And I also purchased this uncrustable maker on Amazon because two of my kids don't really like all the bread. So I will make that on Sunday. I'll just make all the sandwiches, you know, five times 315 sandwiches, you can put mayonnaise, mustard, with your turkey and cheese or Nutella and bananas or peanut butter and jelly and stick it in a little baggie. freeze it. It's done.

Jennifer Uren
That's brilliant. And then you don't have to worry about an ice pack in their lunch because it's cold and it'll thaw by lunchtime.

Julie Dixon
Right. Because I find if I'm like rushing around in the morning to get three kids ready. It's just comical. Really, if, if I'm trying to make their lunch at the same time, it's just one less thing. And that has saved me a lot of time.

Jennifer Uren
That's great. Love it. That's great. And I will I'll put a link to the uncrustable maker in the notes as well.

Julie Dixon
And they're so cute. You can get like a heart, star, Mickey Mouse ears like so many fun things for your kids.

Jennifer Uren
Oh, so fun. Well, Julie, if people wanted to connect with you, how would they find you?

Julie Dixon
So you can find me on Instagram @JulieBDixon.

Jennifer Uren
Excellent. Well, thanks so much. I enjoyed our time and I really appreciate you being here.

Julie Dixon
Thanks, Jennifer.

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