Episode 65: Whitney Chaffin on Profit, Passion, and Second Chances

business Dec 13, 2022
Whitney Chaffin knows Profit, Passion, and Second Chances

Whitney Chaffin is a powerhouse real estate expert, who has learned how to use her passions to generate profit so she can give others a second chance at a meaningful life.

Connect with Whitney on Instagram or her website.

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This is a transcript of the This Mom Knows Podcast - Episode - 65

Jennifer Uren
Whitney Chaffin is a powerhouse. Originally from Ohio, she's now a resident of South Florida where she has traded snow for sandy beaches. Whitney is a real estate expert who speaks to and teaches people across the country how to invest in real estate. Having experienced personal challenges and loss, she turned to volunteering and discovered the joy of helping others succeed. Today, she partners her business success with several nonprofit endeavors, including Whitney's Place where the problem of homelessness is being addressed by providing second chances with housing for people in recovery or transitioning out of prison, as well as helping them invest in real estate as they lay the foundation for their financial security. Whitney is a new mom to her son, Dax as well as being a brand new podcaster with her podcast, The Real Estate Mamas. So welcome, Whitney.

Whitney Chaffin
Thank you so much. I'm so happy to be here today.

Jennifer Uren
Well, I'm glad you're here. Now that bio gave us some broad strokes. But tell us a little bit more like Ohio to Florida. That is a huge change. So what motivated your move?

Whitney Chaffin
Mostly the weather and the sunshine. Where I grew up in Ohio was very gray, like physically ray, I would say...

Jennifer Uren
So you were by a Great Lake.

Whitney Chaffin
Yes. Well, sort of. Yeah. So when I went to college, we were by the Great Lakes where I'm originally from is near actually the Ohio River on the border of Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and Ohio. Still very gray there. But my college town was super gray. Like I remember going and walking to class in the winter. And the campus has built like a wind tunnel. So not only do you have the snow hitting you in the face, but there's also no sunshine. So yeah, I moved to Florida for the heat and the weather.

Jennifer Uren
I moved from Minneapolis to Chicago area. And while it was colder in Minnesota, it was sunny all winter, because we didn't have the lake to produce all the clouds and stuff. So it makes a huge difference.

Whitney Chaffin
It really does. And I mean, it really had to do with my morale, you know, back home I was a happy kid, I would say but I almost kind of always felt like a big fish in a little pond. And I truly think that whether I truly think the weather had something to do with that.

Jennifer Uren
Absolutely. Yes, yes, it is. It's a real thing. So what are your some of your favorite things to do in Florida now that you're down there permanently.

Whitney Chaffin
Now that I'm a new mom, a lot of my day is with my kid, you know, a lot of times we'll go on walks and things like that. But with before I became a mom, I loved going and running this bridge that we have that overlooks the intracoastal and takes you to the ocean. I see that every morning I would meditate on the beach every morning. I would do a lot of hip hop dance actually, I used to take hip hop dance classes for fun, which was always helpful. And in terms of like, you know, physical fitness and just your overall mentality it was always fun to do. But I would say the most Floridian thing I like to do is go to the beach. And then on occasion, we'll go on boats with family and friends, which is always a good time.

Jennifer Uren
Wonderful, well, good. Well, today, we're going to talk about the thing that you know, which is real estate and using that in building wealth. But before we get started, let's get a little bit of your backstory. So why real estate? How did you get involved with real estate in the first place.

So I grew up in a family that was I mean, real estate investors, we my parents owned properties since before I was even born. I think the 80s is when my dad really started investing. And then by the time I was about 11 years old, my dad had already owned 12 properties. So I was kind of bred in real estate, whether I wanted to be an investor or not. Much of my childhood was spent actually renovating properties with my dad, and my brother and my mom, we have I've several memories as a child, but I remember being like five or six years old, my parents would give us a section of the property to paint. And we would paint with like little, you know, play school paint brushes, and they would have to go over it afterwards. But my dad tried to get us involved at a young age. And for a long time, I didn't like real estate. I just I felt like it took me away from my childhood because we were working at a very young age when my friends would be outside playing and had no understanding, you know of work at six and seven years old. So as I grew up, I didn't really want to go that route. I really wanted to be on TV and be in broadcasting. And my voice is kind of faint now but I have a good speaking voice. So I was always like, you know, I'm just gonna get into TV. I'll do entertainment news. And I did for a little bit but I started learning that I really did not like working for someone else. And I didn't like that trading time for money, you know, 40 hours a week, you're, you're working a nine to five. And then I was living in Florida with a 40 hour a week work job with all my friends and family back home still. And I'm like, this sucks. Like, I can never go home to see family and friends, I can never go on vacation unless it's my time off for one week after I've accrued it. So I just kind of had an epiphany when I was about 25 years old that I didn't want to do that. And for years, my dad had tried to preach to me like, you need to do real estate, you need to learn how to do it, you need to buy property, you need passive income and cash flow. And I just didn't have that like, understanding of what that actually meant until I got to the point in my own life where I was like, There's got to be something else. So at 25 years old, actually went to a free real estate workshop, which happened to be the exact same workshop that my dad went to, when I was only 11 years old with the same company and everything. But he's still he works for the company actually, so let's backtrack a little bit. When I was 11 years old, my dad and mom had already owned 12 properties, commercial properties, rental properties, all of that. But my dad had heard an infomercial on TV about, you know, flipping houses and doing it with none of your own money. And so that kind of triggered something in him, because, yes, he was already doing the business. And he already own properties, but he was using all of his own money to do it. So to have this idea of other people's money, it was interesting to him. So he goes to this free real estate workshop. And at the workshop, they sell him into like a three day training about how to flip houses and, you know, do it with none of your own money. So he paid whatever the fee was, I think it was like $2,000 at the time to go to this three day workshop. So he goes to this three day workshop. And then at that three day workshop, they sell him into another thing. You know, that's kind of the theme of seminars, but what was interesting is that, that three day workshop, what they offered him was the opportunity to learn a strategy from A to Z in a course, and then also have hands on mentorship. And that's the one thing he didn't have was like a mentor and coach, analyzing what he had already done and helping him tweak it to really maximize his time. So in a matter of six months of him getting educated and spending whatever 20 grand or something to get a mentor, he ended up going from 12 properties to 60 in those six months using none of his own money. So when that happened, the company was like, Whoa, you're doing what we say. You're you know, you're the walking billboard, basically, we want to bring you on and be a trainer and mentor. So that was in 2002 I think so my dad has been a part of this company that he encouraged me to go be a part of for 15 years at the time. So he told me when I was 25 years old, you know, there's a free workshop in Miami. In your area you should go and and learn you know what it is I've been trying to tell you need to learn. So I go to the free workshop and the trainer at the time her name was Nicole. She knew I was coming and she knew my dad and knew like, okay, Whitney's ready finally. So I went to her free workshop. A week later, I went to a three day training, it was taught by a guy named Jason. And Jason taught me a lot about credit cards and using credit cards to buy real estate. And it was so funny because as he's teaching the concept at the front of the room, I remember my dad teaching me that when I was like 14 years old, but it was like it was out of sight out of mind. I didn't even know I knew it. So he's showing at the front of the room. And I'm like, Oh my gosh, I know this stuff. I can't believe that all these years, I've been saying "No Dad, I don't want to do it." This makes sense. So from there, I went on and took more courses. And I think three months after that training, I did my very first real estate deal, which was called a wholesale deal, and that I made about $3,000. And then two months after that. I did my second deal. And that second deal was a drug and alcohol recovery home where we house 12 men in drug and alcohol addiction. And that was in August of 2016.

Okay, excellent. So isn't it interesting, how our parents - I mean, you're gonna learn this as your son gets older - we can say and they can say and we don't listen, and someone else says it and you're like, oh, so yes. The mom's best friend is her best friend to come along and say, "you know..."

Whitney Chaffin
It's so funny too I mean, even I went to school for broadcasting, and I did a lot of videography when I went for that field. And it's so funny because my dad actually owned a DJ and video service production company for 30 years. So it's like, even though I wasn't on the real estate path, I was still following his path of emceeing and you know, videography, which is funny.

Jennifer Uren
Yes. That's so fun. So on the one hand, you're very passionate about business and on the other hand, you started to mention it there. You're passionate about giving back so why did you start to volunteer, and what was it that sort of made you think, you know, I could make a bigger impact by founding an organization rather than just, you know, volunteering my time, I guess it's kind of that time and money trade.

Whitney Chaffin
Yes. And so, for me, the whole giving aspect came after I went through a depression. I was living in California, right after college. And I actually was, I had moved there to work for Access Hollywood, to be the nanny and assistant to the host, Kitt Hoover, and I was her nanny for a year, and was kind of like her personal assistant at home. And unfortunately, when I was there, I got really depressed because I lived very far away from all my friends and family, literally, on the exact opposite side of the country. We had the time change so I felt like I was always behind with keeping up with my friends and family. I had several negative things happen to me when I lived there, like family members passing away and breakups and you know, everything that could be traumatizing to a 21 year old, but the final straw for me was when I had a friend who had a drug overdose, and he died. And that was kind of my pinnacle of like, okay, I don't need to be here anymore, I really do need to go home because I was depressed, I spent eight months, building up this depression, and then losing a friend like that, and not having anyone to comfort me in that hard time was very difficult. So I ended up reading a book, and I don't even remember what book it was, it might have been like the Power of Now, or something about being present and giving, I couldn't even tell you what it was. But I read somewhere in there that you can sometimes overcome depression by giving back to other people or by volunteering. And so it was crazy how it all worked out. I left California, and I started working at a car dealership. And I know nothing about car sales. But it was any job I could get to get me out of LA to get me back to the East Coast. And so at this car dealership, the unique thing is the owner of the dealership was completely blind, like no usable vision. And so a lot of their advertising, they didn't want to do print ads, because he and his brother who was also blind, they both ran the dealership, they couldn't see the ad. So they were like, you know, we could do TV ads. And that was part of what I did is I did their TV commercials. But what we really want to do is give back to the less fortunate in the community. So they wanted to do a lot of grassroots advertising where they would give $25,000 to a nonprofit, and then have vehicles on display and be their presenting sponsor for whatever cycle of events that nonprofits going to put on for a period of time. So I got super involved with a lot of nonprofits through my work. And it ended up being more than 55 organizations that I worked with at the dealership. But the first group I worked with was a organization called Place of Hope. And they actually house children who are aging out of foster care. So that was the first time I saw real estate paired with a nonprofit, and it didn't even trigger, you know me at that point that that's something that I could do. It wasn't until much later, where it all made sense. And I was like, Oh, wow, like, this is something that could actually be a business opportunity. And, you know, be more advantageous, because you're not just giving time to an organization, you're actually providing a home. So I think just, you know, through the years, everything kind of intertwined and trickled down to be what it was. But it was that that job at the dealership where I really learned about volunteering, and the importance and the impact it can have. And by working for somebody who, you know, could not see at all, and yet sounds so much desire to give to others. It was really, really inspiring.

Jennifer Uren
Yeah, and how interesting that they owned a car dealership when they couldn't drive.

Whitney Chaffin
I know, it's crazy. And it's and so they were able to see at one point, but they have a disease called macular degeneration. So by the time they were each 40, they couldn't see. So it was pretty interesting watching them run a dealership, you know, and profitable. It was it was profitable. And they were really did it for 55 years.

Jennifer Uren
Wow, that's amazing. Well, you started Whitney's Place, tell us a little bit more about that and the impact that it has had.

Whitney Chaffin
So what this place really is a housing provider. And also what it can do, though, is connect people to resources. So I'm extremely connected to drug and alcohol treatment centers here in Florida, as well as in Ohio. But I'm also super connected to all those nonprofits that I worked with. So if someone is needing a second chance, I can either, you know, provide them an opportunity to have work or to get food stamps, or to get their GED or whatever it is. I'm affiliated with legacy education, which is who books these podcasts for me. And we're an education company that allows for people to get a college degree for less than $10,000 online. And we also have the ability to teach people how to invest in real estate. So, you know, if somebody's coming out of prison and they can't go get a job or live in a place because of a criminal background, I can help them you know, find another piece of work by becoming an investor or by providing housing for them because I understand what it takes to, you know, get out of that kind of felony background or whatever bakground they have that's kind of carrying with them.

Jennifer Uren
Oh, that's wonderful. Well, one thing we didn't share about you is that you competed in the Miss Florida pageant

Whitney Chaffin
I did.

Jennifer Uren
And I know one of the reasons that you did that was so that you could use that as a platform for spreading the message and garnering support for Whitney's Place and some of your other volunteer Avenue outlets. But tell us a little bit more about that experience. And did it do what you were hoping it would do?

Whitney Chaffin
It did and it didn't. I think it did more for me than I let me say it this way. It did something different for me than I originally expected. But it was even better. So the whole pageant thing was I was actually nominated to compete because of all the philanthropy work I was doing. I was doing everything that the Miss Florida USA winner and even the contestants were doing, I just didn't really have a platform or recognition for it. So one of the local people with the organizations I worked with said you should compete. Well, in order to get to Miss Florida, you have to qualify. So you have to actually compete in a preliminary pageant, and I had never competed in a pageant. I think when I was 18, I was in a queen thing back home because I was homecoming queen. So you're automatically like, enrolled into this queen of queens pageant, but it's not really like a competition. So this was the first time I really had to learn how to walk, how to pose, how to do makeup, how to do hair, all of it. And I was never a tomboy growing up. But I mean, the way people do makeup now with, you know, the painting on the face, and all the crazy stuff I knew nothing about that I could put on some blush and eyeshadow. And that's all I really knew. But for this pageant world, these girls take this very seriously. So, you know, my thought of pageants prior to this was more about, you know, kind of like the Miss Congeniality movie, you think that they're just pretty faces, but they're actually they're, there's so much more to these girls. And I learned that and the first pageant I had to do was, in January of the year I competed in Miss Florida, which I think was 2015 or 16. And you had to, you know, do a speech, answer a question, walk out in your gown and swimwear or whatever. And I ended up winning that pageant, which was Miss Art Deco. So I represented the art district of Miami. But the thing that they asked me in that pageant was, what do you value most about your life. And in that response, I said, second chances. So from that point forward, my whole message and mission was about second chances that everyone deserves one, everyone needs one. And if you have an opportunity to give one you should, because what you give to the world is going to come back to you. And from that point forward, that was my platform. So while I thought oh I'm gonna win Miss Florida, and become this face of whatever, and it was more ego that I was doing it for but I didn't realize that my entire life from that point forward now became about second chances. And that's my, my, what I speak on, you know, globally, when I travel, when I talk about real estate, it's what I do for other people, I even need some second chances in my life. So it's crazy what it actually did end up doing for me.

Jennifer Uren
That's wonderful. Yes. Grace is another way we often say in our family, we all need grace, because we make mistakes.

Whitney Chaffin
We do certainly, and I'm learning that as a mom.

Jennifer Uren
Yes, yes. Well, as your business began to grow, because we're big on systems over here at This Mom Knows, how did you first kind of discover the power of leveraging systems to help you you delegate, because obviously, you're not doing all of this yourself, and what is the best system that you ever implemented?

Whitney Chaffin
So okay, a couple things, one of my systems, which isn't like an actual technical system, but one thing that helps me more with time and also easing anxiety, because I'm a very anxious person with a lot of energy that balls up and I have to do a lot of, you know, things that bring you back to the present. One thing that really helps me is getting ready the night before, if I wait until the morning to, you know, make my to do list or figure it out, I've already wasted time. So I tried to have my own system of, you know, making an agenda or writing in my journal or setting up the day, the night before. And I actually have a meditation journal that has you do a morning practice and an evening practice. So that helps me kind of get back to present and then wake up refreshed the next day to set out the day. But another system I've used that's more so for real estate specifically, it's called RESS and it's a real estate tool that helps you actually find properties and all the information about properties, all with a click of a button so you don't actually have to physically drive around and look at how as is and as physically run your numbers, and that now that I'm a mom, and because of all the differences that happen with COVID, and how you can't go knock on someone's door to find out information, that system has been a life changer, it really has. It's helped me just maximize my business and my time because now I can be with my son and not have to physically be driving around packing bottles and diapers and all of that.

Jennifer Uren
Yeah. And then when you do have to do that, you know, it's for you reserve that for those really important things.

Whitney Chaffin
Exactly. So even if I have to do that the bottles are prepared the night before.

Jennifer Uren
Yes. And that is a real system doing your evening routine. So I'll often say that a routine is just a practiced system. And so yeah, that's, that's excellent. And it makes a big difference. There's no surprises when you have your evening routine down.

Whitney Chaffin
Yep, yep. 100%. And again, like I said, I'm anxious. So at times, I'll go to bed with all that stuff in my brain and then wake up still having that feeling. And it's like, I don't even want that. If I can just get clear the night before that I can re- relax and go to sleep, and wake up feeling like I can seize the day.

Jennifer Uren
Yeah, yeah, it's almost that difference between I have to remember, and I've written it down, you know, it just it shifts it off of you and onto something else without you losing it.

Whitney Chaffin
Absolutely

Jennifer Uren
Yeah, that's excellent. Well, most mompreneurs build their business while they're parenting, but you kind of came into it in the opposite order. So how has becoming a mom changed your day to day priorities? Particularly with your business? And did you have to make any changes in your business structure? Or had you sort of already gotten to this point where you had the freedom and flexibility to just slide into motherhood, not that anyone slides into motherhood.

Whitney Chaffin
I know. I, I've actually been, so I had a lot of stuff built before, but I felt like I was just getting it built. So in 2018, I started speaking professionally, but I only spoke a few events. 2019, I was I think I spoke 32 weeks out of the year. I made more money in that year that I made my entire life added up from speaking. And then COVID happened. And then eight months later, I got pregnant. So it was almost like I was just getting there to the peak to actually elevate in a very big way. And it kind of, you know, took a little dip. But it took the best dip. Because I've always wanted to be a mom, and I'm getting older, you know, I'm going to be 32 at the end of April. And not that that's old by any means. But I'm ready for a family, I'm ready to be a mom. And I've been ready. I feel like since I was like 21 or 22. And the biggest thing I can say is I've been able to accomplish a lot. By the time I was 28, 29. I made you know, like I said a lot of money before I ever even became 30 years old. So I'm very, very grateful for that. And I think now the biggest transition I've had to make is knowing that I don't have to be the sole provider. And I don't have to do everything myself, because much of my work has been a little bit ego driven, but it's been self driven. I've had to do it all, you know, I've been I've taken out the trash my entire life since I was up to 30. So even having like my partner, my husband you know, having to do chores around the house, I can't even like, tell him what to do, because I'm so used to and conditioned to just doing everything myself. So the big shift I've had to make is knowing that I don't have to do at all and that my priority is my son. And these are the times that I so desperately want to be able to be with him and be present, that I'm actually really excited that I did build the business in the way I did, because now I'm doing a lot from home. And thankfully, because of COVID I'm doing a lot from home. And it's been very, you know, I think reassuring that I'm on the right path. Because for a little bit I was like, why is this happening to me? Not the pregnancy thing. But COVID I'm like, why am I now struggling financially and not able to get where I need to go? Why is this happening? And it's like what happened? Because if I had to slow down myself, I never would have, I needed a pandemic to slow me down.

Jennifer Uren
Yes.

Whitney Chaffin
so I could be present and become a mom.

Jennifer Uren
So now we know why the pandemic happened.

Whitney Chaffin
That's it it was for me.

Jennifer Uren
It was for you. No, but I think you're right. There was a lot of there for as hard as it was and as tragic is the loss of it. There was a lot of positive things I think that really came out, including like in our family it was we were able to shift to focusing on relationship more because we weren't running around and going and doing and there were some really positive things that did come out of lockdown and virtual living.

Whitney Chaffin
Yeah, I was on a plane every week, you know, in a hotel room every week and I was not even at home. I think I was renting an apartment spending a ton of money renting an apartment that I was in four days out of the month.

Jennifer Uren
Yeah, it was a glorified storage unit for your clothes.

Whitney Chaffin
Exactly. Exactly.

Jennifer Uren
Yeah. Oh, well, you talk a lot too about living a life for profit and purpose. So tell us what you mean. And what does that look like for you?

Whitney Chaffin
I've heard people say, like, I need the money to give, that's like a big thing I would love to give, but I can't until I have kind of mentality. And then I also have heard people say, it's wrong, if you're helping, and you're making money off of the helping and I don't agree with either one, I think that you have to give in order to get to that point to be able to receive. And then once you start receiving, yes, you continue to give more, but now you've given so much, we're not having it that you do deserve to be paid for your time to give at that point, you know, so the whole profit and purpose message is really about kind of the housing model that I have, where I will purchase a home or rent a home from somebody, then I will fill it with six to 12 people who need a second chance, and each person will pay a fee to live there. But a lot of times that money is coming from the government. So that individual is getting a voucher essentially to have a home for six to 12 months that they're not paying for they're getting their feet, you know, get back on their feet, I'll get a profit for providing that house because we got to keep on the water, the lights, the cable, you know all those things. And then I'm paid a fee for my time to do so. I'm not becoming a multimillionaire off of the investment. But we're paid for our time and paid for the property to continue to flow. So most of the profit and purpose is that but what we're doing is providing a safe place for people to get their life back. I have one guy in particular, I won't say his name just to protect him from HIPAA laws. But when I met him, he was shooting heroin on a regular basis. And he now is almost four years sober, maybe even almost five years, it's been a while he's almost five years sober. He's got a son, and now he's getting married, and he's living back with his family. And I get messages all the time "Thank you so much. Because of your home, we've been able to..." you know, give a great place for him to see that there is light at the end of the tunnel. And there is a sense of community. And that's what it's been able to provide. So you know, I feel like a lot of that stuff. Yeah, you're gonna make money, but you don't even look at the money because it's about the individual you're helping.

Jennifer Uren
Yeah. So it's being passionate about what you're doing. And not just it's not a job. It's a calling.

Whitney Chaffin
Yes, exactly. And so many times people will come to me because I teach how to invest in these houses for social good, because it doesn't have to be just addiction. It could be homeless veterans, it could be women of domestic violence, whatever. But someone will just say, I just want to make money. If that's your philosophy, you're in the wrong business, if you're trying to do social housing, because you can't you cannot have somebody coming to you with their literally their last breath because they want to go get high and would rather be dead, then, you know have you even be their friend, they're in that low of a place that if all you care about is $1. You can't you can't and there's people who do that there are bad people out there that will just take the money to be able to make the money. But if I have anything to do with it, it's going to be people who genuinely, you know, have a passion for whatever group they're helping.

Jennifer Uren
Yeah, well, excellent. Well, I know there is a mompreneur listening, who is thinking, you know, I would love the freedom and the opportunities that, you know, this financial success would offer. But I am nowhere near that. Now, I know you didn't get here overnight. But what would you share as one thing that she could do today to start to lay the foundation, you know, for building something that's financially successful and gives her freedom?

Whitney Chaffin
There's a couple of things. One of the main things I tend to always say this answer in a podcast interview, but I feel like it just holds so much weight, it's figure out why you want to do whatever it is you want to do. Yeah, a lot of like, you know, multilevel marketing companies and even podcasts and motivational people talk about your why. And what they're really meaning is, you could say I want to have the money so I can have financial freedom. But what does that actually mean? What does that mean for your family? Does that mean that my son is going to be able to go to whatever college he wants, or that means that you're going to be able to watch your child get married and not have to call off work, you know, whatever the big mission and why is that's the first step because none of the things you want to accomplish are going to be easy. But if you remember why you started, when you feel like giving up, you're more than likely not going to because you've got that big, solid core purpose of why you're doing what you're doing. And then from there, once you figure out your why, the thing I always like to do too, is figure out what you don't want in your life. If you're in a really bad relationship. Or if you're in your really bad job or just a bad circumstance, write down what you don't want. And then you'll figure out exactly what you do want. And then focus on that. Put it in a place that you see it every day, whether it's on your mirror, in your journal, on a vision board, whatever, and focus on that, and then do something everyday that's going to get you closer to that goal. Let's say for example, you're trying to save money. Well, if you're offered an opportunity to go drink with friends on the weekend, ask yourself how is this going to affect my goal? You know, is it going to help me get closer to it or take me further away from it?

Jennifer Uren
Yeah, that's excellent. My husband often says, how will you know, what will it look like when this things happens? And I think that's that's a helpful with that "Why?" because, you know, it's easy to go, this is what I want. But we don't always define what it looks like in a way that we can then measure because it doesn't feel measurable. Experience doesn't feel measurable. But it can actually be if we know what it is we're watching for.

Whitney Chaffin
I agree. Yep. I agree.

Jennifer Uren
Well, this has been a great conversation. And as we wrap up here, I'm going to ask you one of my favorite questions I ask every guest because I am a gadget girl. I'm a systems person. So what is your favorite time-saving gadget, system, or tool?

Whitney Chaffin
Gadget system or tool? Honestly, I know it's kind of cliche, maybe even obvious, but it's got to be just my iPhone in general. Everything I need I - which is bad I don't want to be so technologically dependent - but I feel like it is the time saver because if I'm trying to find out an answer, I quickly google it. If I'm trying to find information about anything. It's all right here in this device, which I think is a detriment to many of us. But I really do believe that it's the it's the one tool that I don't think I could live without.

Jennifer Uren
Yeah, especially now that you have a baby. And it's got the great camera, and you can share pictures with all the grandparents.

Whitney Chaffin
That's it. And if we're out to eat and he starts crying, you throw on coco melon really quickly.

Jennifer Uren
You will lose your mind, but he will be calm.

Whitney Chaffin
That's right.

Jennifer Uren
Well, Whitney, how can people connect with you?

Whitney Chaffin
So the best way right now is probably my Instagram just as which is my name, it's Whit W H I T. And my last name Chaffin C H A F F as in Frank, I N as in Nancy. I'm just that's the only the only app that I get notifications for. So if somebody does message me or follow me, I can see that and I follow back. But if they're wanting to learn how to to kind of do the social housing type thing, we do have a website. It's called LegacyEducation.com. And that is actually where you can take courses to learn how to do what I do. And I'm actually a mentor for people. So if they were to go there, take some courses and they want to have me as a mentor. They can sign up to do that. I do phone mentoring for a lot of our students.

Jennifer Uren
Excellent. Well, thanks so much for your time today. And it'll be fun to follow along and see as your little guy grows.

Whitney Chaffin
Yes, I know. It's going so fast. It's crazy how fast they grow.

Jennifer Uren
Enjoy it.

Whitney Chaffin
Yes. Thanks so much.

 

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